Most common pediatric skin conditions managed in outpatient dermatology clinics in the United States stratified by race and ethnicity

Abstract

A better understanding of what skin conditions are most commonly diagnosed in different pediatric racial and ethnic groups in outpatient dermatology clinics could help guide the development of pediatric dermatology educational initiatives for primary care providers and general dermatologists who have limited access to pediatric dermatologists. Using a nationally representative dataset, we evaluated the most common diagnoses in patients younger than 15 years of age (children) and 15-24 years of age (youth) who present to outpatient dermatology clinics, stratified by race and ethnicity. While acne and dermatitis were among the top ten most common diagnoses in all racial and ethnic groups studied, Black children were also commonly diagnosed with dermatophytosis and impetigo, and Black and Hispanic children were often diagnosed with seborrheic dermatitis; pigmentary disorders were among the top three most common diagnoses in Black, Asian, and Hispanic youth. Training more physicians how to evaluate and treat common skin conditions in children and youth of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds may improve access to care for skin disease in the United States.